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This is just absolutely adorable!

more: moss&bone

100 posts! 
Woohoo! So incredibly ecstatic I’ve reached a hundred posts and here’s to a hundred more my lovely followers! :D

100 posts! 

Woohoo! So incredibly ecstatic I’ve reached a hundred posts and here’s to a hundred more my lovely followers! :D

Ed Sheeran has to by far one of my favorite artists. I love the lyrics to his songs; they are just pure poetry. With every song he releases, I find that I only swell with more love for him

"I’m in love with people that are in love with the world."

-

Bill Mackin

(via kimlundgren)

Jason Silva never fails to excite with shots of awe! This is his latest: 'Transfixed by beauty'. 

Music; its all around us. Whether we like it or not, its everywhere. Be it rock, pop, country, indie, electronic,techno, it is everywhere. 
Music speaks to people in a way words simply can’t. The lyrics of songs are like the words of Shakespeare to a literature professor or simply an avid reader; music says the things we could never say in person. When you really think about, you could know more about a person by looking at their playlist in a matter of five minutes rather then having a conversation with them. 
"Without music, life would be a mistake."

Music; its all around us. Whether we like it or not, its everywhere. Be it rock, pop, country, indie, electronic,techno, it is everywhere. 

Music speaks to people in a way words simply can’t. The lyrics of songs are like the words of Shakespeare to a literature professor or simply an avid reader; music says the things we could never say in person. When you really think about, you could know more about a person by looking at their playlist in a matter of five minutes rather then having a conversation with them. 

"Without music, life would be a mistake."

"And in the end, we were all just humans, drunk on the idea,that love, only love, could heal our brokenness" 
~ Christopher Poindexter

"And in the end, we were all just humans, drunk on the idea,that love, only love, could heal our brokenness" 

~ Christopher Poindexter

tumblrbot asked: WHERE WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO VISIT ON YOUR PLANET?

Most of Europe; Really want to go Paris as well!

Book Review: 'Where Rainbows End' by Cecelia Ahern
I’m not going to lie, I’m a huge sucker for Romance novels and chick-lits; as much as I enjoy my dysoptian, mystery and horror genres, there’s something about chick-lits that make you want to cry, laugh and smile all at once. 
So you can imagine my surprise when I hadn’t heard of Cecelia Ahern, author of the best-selling books 'PS, I Love You' and ’If You could see me now’. Hearing about her novels was enough persuasion to make me read 'Where Rainbows end'. 
'Where Rainbows End' is your typical chick-lit that starts with two friends, Alex and Rosie, who have been neighbors in Dublin as well as best friends since they were seven. The novel unravels their journey as friends, the moments they share together and their lives as they go through various stages in them. However , they face a dilemma when Alex is forced to move to America because of his father's job during his senior year of high school. As soon as Rosie is about to join him in Boston she receives life-changing news that prevents her from going. 
As I’ve said this is your typical chick-lit plot, and the ending is quite predictable, however, Ahern does well to keep her pace and not drag the reader through the novel like some chick-lits. Moreover, it is an absorbing novel and a complete page turner; Ahern is a perfect example  for any budding romance novelist. She makes you feel the pain and joy of each character and constantly keeps the story upbeat with events that change the direction of the novel, 
In conclusion, a great book for first time chick-lit readers, but don’t read it if you don’t want something too predictable. 

Book Review: 'Where Rainbows End' by Cecelia Ahern

I’m not going to lie, I’m a huge sucker for Romance novels and chick-lits; as much as I enjoy my dysoptian, mystery and horror genres, there’s something about chick-lits that make you want to cry, laugh and smile all at once. 

So you can imagine my surprise when I hadn’t heard of Cecelia Ahern, author of the best-selling books 'PS, I Love You' and ’If You could see me now’. Hearing about her novels was enough persuasion to make me read 'Where Rainbows end'. 

'Where Rainbows End' is your typical chick-lit that starts with two friends, Alex and Rosie, who have been neighbors in Dublin as well as best friends since they were seven. The novel unravels their journey as friends, the moments they share together and their lives as they go through various stages in them. However , they face a dilemma when Alex is forced to move to America because of his father's job during his senior year of high school. As soon as Rosie is about to join him in Boston she receives life-changing news that prevents her from going. 

As I’ve said this is your typical chick-lit plot, and the ending is quite predictable, however, Ahern does well to keep her pace and not drag the reader through the novel like some chick-lits. Moreover, it is an absorbing novel and a complete page turner; Ahern is a perfect example  for any budding romance novelist. She makes you feel the pain and joy of each character and constantly keeps the story upbeat with events that change the direction of the novel, 

In conclusion, a great book for first time chick-lit readers, but don’t read it if you don’t want something too predictable. 

“Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there-on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot.Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.”  
~ Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A vision of the Human Future in the Space

“Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there-on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.”  

~ Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A vision of the Human Future in the Space

"We could never design a building as beautiful as the trees."

- Pietro Belluschi, Architect (via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)

Eureka!

I walked into the oh-so familiar atmosphere of the place I so deeply dreaded. I found it so irritatingly ironic how such a torturous place could be painted such a bright and cheery like yellow. Where am I you may wonder? Why where else but my math class.

I shifted one slowly to take my seat, looking back at the door, wondering whether or not to make a run for it; noticing Mr. Miller’s glare I decide not to. Heaving a heavy sigh, I take my seat right at the back, avoiding his menacing glare and buried my head into my hoodie.

“Good morning class!” exclaimed Mr. Miller in his thick Lanky accent.

“Good morning Mr. Miller“, droned the rest of the class, except me. It was never a good morning when first period was math.

“Today we’ll be starting with a new chapter; Algebra Two!” A wave of groans filled the classroom, inclusive of mine. How could one man possibly be THAT excited about alphabets and numbers? Did he have that boring of a life?

“Now now class, it’s not that difficult”, ‘Lies’ I had thought to myself, “And at the end of the week we shall a test on the topic, so pay attention. Let’s begin; please turn to page two hundred and fifty two; quadratic equations. Now the basic form of a quadratic equation ax squared plus bx plus c”… And with that I slowly felt myself drifting in uncontrollable trance of sleep. Everything became blackly oblivious to me.

 

“Wake up boy! Wake up!” shouted an extremely unfamiliar voice who was vigorously shaking me.
“I’m up! I’m up!” I shouted back now standing, only to have an elderly looking man staring at me. His hair was grey and frizzy that much resembled something between a ginormous dust bunny and an expired mound of candy floss; with his odd hair came an even odder, matching mustache. His face was a map of wrinkles; weathered; only adding to the age of his physical appearance. He was dressed in a dark wool sweater and sand-colored khaki’s with impeccably polished brown  dress shoes; remembering the exact same shoes I wear for church. 

“Who are you?” I asked after what seemed like forever. He pointed to the bulletin board behind me where pictures of famous people in mathematics were pinned. Euler, Pythagoras… and then there was Einstein. I looked back and for between him and his picture only to wonder ‘Have I gone insane?’

The world’s most intellectual being in history was standing right in front of me.

“EINSTEIN! Its you!” He smiled coyly.

“Yes, yes it’s me. But enough about me; why were you napping in math Brian?” It was only then I realized we were the only two people in the classroom.

“Where is everybody?”

“That’s not important! Answer my question first.” I raised my eyebrow at him, yet proceeded to answer.

“Because its math,” I said shrugging.

The expression that came over his face at that moment was unforgettable. It was like a mix of shock and astonishment.

“What do you mean ‘because its just math?”

It was amusing that one of the planet’s smartest people on Earth – someone who has been responsible for many of the most complex and complicated of  breakthroughs and theories, and a winner of the Nobel prize – couldn’t possibly comprehend the simplest answers I had just given him.

I sighed.

“It’s boring, it’s pointless and when am I EVER going to use it in life?” I stressed on the ‘ever’ part. I mean honestly, if I had to save someone from a burning building I’m not going to use a quadratic equation am I?

He gasped like he was having a heart-attack. For a split second, I thought I had killed this elderly genius a second time. And then I apprehended that he just couldn’t grasp what I had just said. Was I speaking in tongues? This really wasn’t that hard to understand.

He ensued to collect himself and said: “My dear boy what do you want to do with your life?”

I thought to myself and smiled. “I want to become a dancer!”

“Show me some of your dance steps.”

I advanced to show him a move. This rush came over my body; a rhythm like no other flowed through it. Dancing was my passion; it filled my soul like nothing else. “Five, six, seven, eight,” I counted as he watched, mesmerized.

He brought his hands together and clapped, joy in his eyes.

“Very, very good. But what was that you were just doing there?”

“Counting?”

“Counting what?”

“Dance moves?”

“And what is counting?”

I stared at him and slowly said “Math?”

“Good. Now if I know two dance steps and you teach me another two steps, how many do I know?” He wrote ‘2+2=?’ on the board. I watched at him, wondering what he was trying to prove to me.

“Easy. You know four.”

“Wonderful! Now if I replace one of the twos with an ‘x’ what’s my answer?”

“Your answer is still four…” I still couldn’t quite distinguish what the point of this exercise was.

“That is algebra. See, my dear boy, the reason you find math so complex, confusing and boring is because no one has ever taught you to appreciate it. No one has ever taught you to beauty of math.”

It suddenly all made sense. The reason no one enjoyed dancing unless it was in a movie was because no understand the creative expression behind it; the message it was trying to send or why it was being portrayed in a certain way.

I was quickly snapped out of my thoughts when Einstein exclaimed “Let’s do another!”

Hours later, waves of graphs and an endless mound of x’s and y’s filled the black board.  There was barely any place left. I gazed at what I accomplished so far. Things I had so desperately struggled to understood, and achieve for years were taught to me in a matter of hours. Everything finally made sense.

All that was left was a quadratic equation. I scrawled my answer in what little space was left.

“EUREKA! By God, my dear boy you’ve done it! You’ve done it!” At the moment, the greatest man in world hugged me. But only to drop a heavy math textbook on my foot.

“Ow!” I shrieked.

“Brian, Brian are you OK? Brian, Brian…”

“Brian, Brian, wake up boy! Class is over!” Have you been sleeping this entire time?”
I looked up, dazed, completely star-struck to see my math teacher and not Einstein to be in front of me.  If looks could kill, Mr. Millers would have been a dictator with his.

The next week I received my math test scores. I had gotten a B. I couldn’t remember the last time I got one at least in math. 

“Well I’m very surprised Brian. Did you cheat? Or have you been going for extra lessons somewhere?”

“No sir I didn’t cheat. And yes I did take an extra lesson. From Einstein.”

I smiled and looked back at the picture of Einstein on the bulletin board. I could have sworn he winked at me. 

Link to Glog: http://simraha.edu.glogster.com/english-formative-assessment

I just think this is marvelous.

I just think this is marvelous.